Stage 2 Hodgkin’s Lymphoma
Stages of Hodgkin lymphoma
The stages of Hodgkin lymphoma tell you about the amount and places within the body that are suffering from lymphoma. Knowing the stage of Hodgkin lymphoma helps your doctor to make a decision what treatment you would like .






The Lugano classification is used to stage lymphoma. There are 4 stages. Or these are often simplified into limited or advanced stage.
What is Stage 2 Hodgkin’s lymphoma?
Stage II: Either of the subsequent means the HL is stage II: HL is found in 2 or more lymph gland areas on an equivalent side of (above or below) the diaphragm, which is that the thin muscle beneath the lungs that separates the chest and abdomen (II).

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Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma Types

Non-hodgkin’s lymphoma vs Hodgkin’s lymphoma
Stage 2
This means one of the following:
• Your lymphoma has spread to two or more lymph node classes.
• Your lymphoma has spread to an extranodal site, and one or more groups of lymph nodes have been affected (2E)
In both cases, the two sites of lymphoma are on an equivalent side of the diaphragm.
Below is an example of stage 2.

Lymphoma stage groupings
The words “stage I” to “stage IV” are used to characterize the degree of the tumor’s spread in Hodgkin lymphoma (1 through 4).As explained in Symptoms and Signs, each stage also can be further divided into “A” and “B” categories, supported whether or not the person is experiencing specific symptoms.
Stage I: Lymphoma is present in only one lymph gland. Or, the lymphoma has invaded 1 extralymphatic organ or site (identified using the letter “E”) but not any lymph gland regions (stage IE); this is often rare in Hodgkin lymphoma.






Stage II: Any of the following conditions applies:
• Stage II: The lymphoma is in 2 or more lymph gland regions on an equivalent side of the diaphragm.
• Stage IIE: The lymphoma involves 1 organ and its regional lymph nodes (lymph nodes located near the location of the lymphoma), with or without lymphoma in other lymph gland regions on the same side of the diaphragm.
• Stage II bulky: Either stage II or stage IIE applies, plus there’s a mass within the chest. The mass is less than one-third of the chest’s diameter or 10 centimeters in diameter (cm). A centimeter is roughly adequate to the width of a typical pen or pencil.
Stage III: there’s lymphoma in lymph gland areas on each side of the diaphragm, meaning above and below it.
Stage IV lymphoma has spread beyond the lymph nodes to one or more organs. Hodgkin lymphoma is most often found in the liver, bone marrow, or lungs.
Lymphoma that returns after treatment is known as recurrent lymphoma. Lymphoma can recur in the same spot where it began or in a different part of the body. Recurrence may occur at any time, including shortly after the primary treatment or years later. If the lymphoma does return, there’ll be another round of tests to find out about the extent of the recurrence. These tests and scans are often almost like those done at the time of the first diagnosis.
The prognosis for Stage 2 Hodgkin’s lymphoma
Stage 2. Around 90 out of 100 people (around 90%) will survive their Hodgkin lymphoma for 5 years or more after diagnosis.
Treatment
Treatment for stage 2 Hodgkin lymphoma is typically 2 to 4 cycles of chemotherapy. You might also have radiotherapy.
Stages IA and IIA, favorable
This category contains HL that only affects one side of the diaphragm (above or below) and has no negative influences. For example:
• It’s not bulky
• HL has spread to three or more lymph node regions.
• It isn’t linked to any of the B symptoms.
• The ESR (erythrocyte sedimentation rate) isn’t elevated
Chemotherapy (usually 2 to 4 cycles of the ABVD regimen) is given to a number of patients, accompanied by radiation to the disease’s initial site (involved site radiotherapy , or ISRT). Another option is chemotherapy alone (usually for 3 to six cycles) in selected patients.
Doctors often order a PET/CT scan after a couple of courses of chemo to ascertain how well the treatment is functioning and to work out what proportion more treatment (if any) is required .
If an individual can’t have chemotherapy due to other health issues, radiotherapy alone could also be an option.
For those that don’t answer treatment, chemo using different drugs or high-dose chemo (and possibly radiation) followed by a somatic cell transplant could also be recommended. Treatment with an immunotherapy drug like brentuximab vedotin (Adcetris), nivolumab (Opdivo), or pembrolizumab (Keytruda) could be an alternative choice .
Stages I and II, unfavorable
This category includes HL on only one side of the diaphragm (above or below), but with one or more of the following risk factors:
• It’s bulky (the tumor is large)



•HL has spread to three or more lymph node regions.
• Outside of the lymph nodes, there is cancer (called extranodal involvement)
• It’s causing B symptoms
• The ESR (erythrocyte sedimentation rate) is high
Treatment is usually more intense than that for favorable disease. It typically starts with chemotherapy (usually with the ABVD regimen for 4 to six cycles or other regimens like 3 cycles of Stanford V).
PET/CT scans are often done after several cycles of chemo to ascertain if (and how much) more treatment is required . This is often followed by more, and perhaps different, chemo. Radiation therapy (involved field radiotherapy , or IFRT) is typically given to the sites of the tumor at now , especially if it had been bulky disease.
For those that don’t answer treatment, chemo using different drugs or high-dose chemo (and possibly radiation) followed by a somatic cell transplant could also be recommended. Treatment with an immunotherapy drug like brentuximab vedotin (Adcetris), nivolumab (Opdivo), or pembrolizumab (Keytruda) could be an alternative choice .

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Stage 2 Hodgkin's Lymphoma