Praluent vs Repatha efficacy








Praluent and Repatha are injectable medicines used to treat hypercholesterolemia, or high cholesterol, by lowering LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C). Both medications are PCSK9 inhibitors, which improve the liver’s ability to eliminate LDL-C from the bloodstream. Despite their effectiveness, both drugs are relatively costly.

What is Praluent?

Alirocumab is marketed under the brand name Praluent. It has been approved by the FDA to treat HeFH and clinical atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. It is suggested that it be used in conjunction with a healthy diet and oral statin medication.

Praluent is given twice a week as a 75 mg/mL or 150 mg/mL injection. It comes in the form of a pre-filled pen or a syringe. A 150 mg/mL injection every two weeks is the maximum dosage. Depending on your doctor’s instructions, it can be taken once a month if preferred.

What is Repatha?

Evolocumab is the generic name for Repatha. It is used to reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke in people who have already had a heart attack or stroke. It can also treat adults with HeFH, just like Praluent. However, it can help people with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH), a more severe form of high cholesterol, lower their LDL cholesterol. It can be used alone to decrease cholesterol in some circumstances, unlike Praluent.




Every two weeks or monthly, Repatha is given as a 140 mg/mL injection. Repatha is available as a prefilled syringe, a single-use Pushtronex infusor system, and a SureClick autoinjector pen. The 420 mg/3.5 mL solution in the infusor system can be delivered during a 9-minute period. Because of its simplicity, some people may favor the Pushtronex.

Praluent vs. Repatha efficacy

What is the difference between Repatha and Praluent?

The active components, dosage forms available, and number of strengths available in syringe and pens formats is the distinctions between Repatha (evolocumab) and Praluent (alirocumab).

Repatha has additional therapeutic indications than Praluent: while Praluent is only for adults, Repatha can be used to treat children over the age of 10 with specified indications.

Praluent and Repatha have the same therapeutic indications for adults:

Preventing cardiovascular illness in persons with established cardiovascular disease, specifically myocardial infarction, stroke, and unstable angina necessitating hospitalization.

For adults Praluent and Repatha have the same treatment indications:

  • Preventing cardiovascular illness in persons with established cardiovascular disease, specifically myocardial infarction, stroke, and unstable angina necessitating hospitalization.
  • Adults with primary hyperlipidemia should be treated especially to lower their low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). Patients with Heterozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia [HeFH] are included. To be used in conjunction with a change in diet and/or other lipid-lowering drugs.
  • LDL-C reduction for patients with Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia (HoFH) that can be administered with or without additional lipid-lowering medications such as statins or ezetimibe.

Repatha can be used to treat the following conditions in children:

    • Patients with HeFH who are 10 years or older can use Repatha in conjunction with a change in diet and other LDL-C-lowering drugs to lower LDL-C.




  • Patients with HoFH who are 10 years or older can combine Repatha with other LDL-C reducing medications to lower LDL-C levels.

Praluent does not have as many dose formulations as Repatha.

Repatha has three dosing forms compared to Praluent’s two, which may make Repatha more convenient for some individuals.

Praluent and Repatha both come in the following dose forms:

  • Pre-filled pen
  • Single-use prefilled syringe

Repatha also comes in a third dosage form:

  • infusor with prefilled cartridge worn on the body

Praluent has a wider range of strengths for syringes and pens than Repatha.

Praluent patients can have their dose modified because Repatha has just one strength accessible in syringe and pen, whereas Praluent has two strengths.

The strength of the Repatha single-use prefilled syringe and pre-filled pen is

  • 140 mg/mL.

The Praluent single-use prefilled syringe and prefilled pen come in a variety of strengths.

  • 75 mg/mL
  • 150mg/mL

What are the similarities between Repatha and Praluent?

  • They are both PCSK9 inhibitors and belong to the same medication class.
  • They should both be used in conjunction with a cholesterol and triglyceride-lowering diet.
  • Repatha and Praluent can be taken alone or in combination with other lipid-lowering medications (e.g., statins, ezetimibe).
  • When taken for Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia, both Repatha and Praluent can be used with LDL apheresis (HoFH).

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Is it safe to use when trying to conceive, pregnant, or breastfeeding?

Praluent

There isn’t enough evidence to suggest that pregnant or nursing women are at risk. If you’re pregnant or breastfeeding, talk to your doctor about taking Praluent.

Repatha

There isn’t enough evidence to suggest that pregnant or nursing women are at risk. If you’re pregnant or breastfeeding, talk to your doctor about using Repatha.

Average Cash Price

Praluent

$671 (perĀ  140 mg/ml injection)

Repatha

$1,346 (per 2, 1 mL Praluent pen)

Common Side Effects

Praluent

  • Injection site reaction
  • Nasopharyngitis
  • Influenza

Repatha

  • Injection site reaction
  • Nasopharyngitis
  • Influenza
  • Upper respiratory tract infection
  • Back pain
  • Diabetes mellitus

Prescribed For

Praluent

Heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HeFH) is treated with this drug in combination with maximum-dose statin therapy.

Lipid lowering in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease combined with statin therapy at maximum dose

Repatha

Myocardial infarction, stroke, and coronary revascularization prevention

Heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HeFH) on its own or in combination with high-dose statin therapy.

Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH) in conjunction with statin medication at maximum dose

Summary

PCSK9 inhibitors such as Repatha and Praluent can considerably lower LDL cholesterol levels. While they are both successful at treating high cholesterol, they are significantly more expensive than typical statin medication.

To decrease cholesterol, Praluent should be used in conjunction with statin therapy. Repatha, on the other hand, is a single-drug treatment for high cholesterol. In addition to HeFH and HoFH, Repatha can lower the risk of heart attack, stroke, and coronary vascularization.



Although both medications can be given every two weeks or once a month, Repatha has more injectable choices. Pre-filled syringes and pen units are available for Praluent and Repatha. Repatha can also be given by an on-body infusor system, which may be more convenient for those who don’t like injections.

Because of their exorbitant cost, these drugs are normally only taken as a last resort. They can, however, be effective for decreasing cholesterol and, in rare situations, even averting death. Still, it’s a good idea to talk to your doctor about these medications and all of your treatment options.

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Praluent vs. Repatha efficacy

Praluent vs. Repatha efficacy

Praluent vs. Repatha efficacy

Praluent vs. Repatha efficacy