Physical therapy exercises for hip pain

Overview

If you experience hip pain, physical therapy exercises can help you increase your mobility and relieve your discomfort. Working with a physical therapist (PT) can help you figure out which workouts are right for you.



Loss of range of motion, decreased strength and muscle activation around the hip joint, and pain that affects your ability to walk or run properly are all common symptoms of hip pain. Physical therapy exercises for hip pain will help you regain your strength and mobility so you can resume your regular activities.

There are many different causes of hip pain. These may include:

  • Osteoarthritis
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Iliotibial band friction syndrome
  • Piriformis syndrome
  • Sciatica
  • Labrum tear
  • Femeroacetabluar impingement (FAI)
  • Trochanteric bursitis
  • Fracture or trauma

If you believe your hip discomfort is the result of a big trauma, you should see your doctor right immediately to get it checked out; a serious injury, such as a fracture, may be present, necessitating immediate medical attention.

Hip discomfort and limitations can present itself in a variety of ways. These may include the following: You’re experiencing groin pain.

  • Your hip is hurting in the front.
  • Hip discomfort on the side
  • Buttock ache
  • You’re having trouble moving your hip and leg.
  • Walking, sprinting, or climbing stairs is difficult.
  • When getting up from a seated position, there is pain.

Physical therapy exercises for hip pain could be a helpful treatment for you. Movements to develop flexibility, strength, and balance may be included in the exercises.

Before you begin, think about the following points

Hip discomfort can be relieved with flexibility and strength exercises. These exercises should not induce or aggravate pain, despite the fact that they may produce brief discomfort. Stop completing an exercise if it causes pain, or go at a slower or gentler speed.

Before attempting any of the exercises below, individuals who have recently undergone a hip replacement should contact with a doctor or physical therapist.

Exercises 1–4
The first four exercises help to stretch the muscles that surround the hip joint, which can help to reduce stiffness and enhance joint mobility.

These exercises should be done when a person is feeling the least degree of discomfort and stiffness. They’re best done after a warm shower or bath, when the muscles are at their most relaxed.

Start by doing one or two workouts every day, three times per week. If you’re comfortable with this, try doing a few exercises once a day.

Exercises 5–14

The goal of these exercises is to strengthen the hip muscles so that they can better support the hip joint and relieve pain.

Resistance training is a type of exercise that focuses on building muscle strength. Resistance training involves using light weights or one’s own body weight to provide resistance for muscles to work against.

If these exercises cause hip pain or discomfort for more than an hour, the number of repetitions should be reduced proportionately.



1. Knee lift

Knee lifts are performed as follows:

  1. Lie on your back with both legs extended flat on the floor.
  2. Pull the right knee up toward the chest while keeping the left leg straight.
  3. To help draw the knee in toward the chest, place both hands on top of it.
  4. For a total of 10 seconds, hold the stretch.
  5. Release the kneecap and slowly lower the leg to the floor.

On each knee, repeat this exercise 5–10 times.

2. External hip rotation

To do external hip rotations, follow these steps:

  1. Sit on the floor with your legs outstretched in front of you.
  2. Bend your legs at the knees and press your feet’s soles together.
  3. Place a hand on top of each knee and gradually lower them to the floor. Apply pressure to the knees until they
  4. stretch, but don’t go any further than you’re comfortable with.
  5. Hold the stretch for 10 seconds before letting go.

5–10 times, repeat the stretch.

3. Double hip rotation

To accomplish double hip rotations, follow these steps:

  1. Lie down flat on your back. Bend your knees and pull them closer to your body until your feet are flat on the floor.
  2. Gently lower the knees to the floor by rotating them to the left. Turn your head to the right while maintaining your shoulders pressed towards the floor.
  3. For 20–30 seconds, stay in this position.
  4. Return the head and legs to their starting positions slowly.
  5. Rep the process on the other side.

4. Hip and lower back stretch

Stretch your hips and lower back as follows:

  1. Bend the knees and move them toward the body until the feet are flat on the floor while lying flat on your back.
  2. Pull both knees in toward the chest with your hands.
  3. Exhale slowly and deeply, bringing your knees closer to your shoulders with each breath.
  4. Go as far as you can comfortably go, then hold for 20–30 seconds. Take a normal breath.

5. Hip flexion

To do hip flexions, follow these steps:

  1. Maintain a straight posture.
  2. Extend one arm to the side and grasp on to a solid surface for support, such as a wall, table, or chair.
  3. Raise the right knee to hip level or as far as comfortable while keeping the left leg straight.
  4. Hold this position for a split second before returning the left foot to the floor.
  5. Replace the right knee with the left.

This exercise should be done 5–10 times.

6. Hip extension

To perform hip extensions:

  1. Maintain a straight posture.
  2. Extend one arm to the side and grasp on to a solid surface for support, such as a wall, table, or chair.
  3. Raise the right knee to hip level or as far as comfortable while keeping the left leg straight.
  4. Hold this position for a split second before returning the left foot to the floor.
  5. Replace the right knee with the left.

This exercise should be done 5–10 times.

7. Hip abduction

To do hip abduction exercises, follow these steps:

  1. Maintain a straight posture.
  2. Extend your left arm to the side and grab a sturdy object like a chair, table, or wall.
  3. Lift the right leg out to the side, starting with the feet together. Maintain a straight left leg and avoid rotating the hips.
  4. Hold for 5 seconds before slowly returning the leg to the beginning position.
  5. Perform this exercise 5–10 times on one leg, then switch sides.

8. Heel-to-buttock exercise

To do heel-to-buttock movements, follow these steps:

  1. Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart and your legs straight. Hold on to a chair, table, or wall for support.
  2. Bring the heel of the left foot up toward the left buttock, with the top of the foot towards the floor, by bending the left knee. Keep your right leg straight and your knees aligned.
  3. Return to the starting posture by slowly lowering the leg.
  4. Carry on with the exercise on the other side.

On each leg, aim for 5–10 repetitions.

9. Mini squat

To do mini squats, follow these steps:

  1. Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart and your back straight.
  2. Hold on to a chair, table, or wall for support if necessary.
  3. Gently lower the body by bending the knees until they are above the toes while keeping the back straight. The feet should be flat on the ground at all times.
  4. Hold for a few seconds before slowly straightening your legs to return to the beginning position.

5–10 repetitions of mini squats

10. Short-arc quadriceps exercise

To do short-arc quadriceps exercises, follow these steps:

  1. Place a pillow or rolled-up towel beneath the right knee while lying flat on your back.
  2. Bend the knee and slide the left foot back toward the buttock.
  3. Lift the right foot off the floor slowly while pressing the back of the right knee into the pillow or towel.
  4. Hold for 5 seconds before lowering the right leg softly back to the starting position.
  5. Perform 5–10 lifts on one leg before switching to the other.

11. Quadriceps exercise

To perform quadriceps exercises, follow these steps:

  1. Throughout the workout, lie flat on your back and maintain your legs straight.
  2. Both knees should be pushed toward the floor, and both feet should be flexed by drawing the toes toward the torso.
  3. Relax after 5 seconds of holding the position.
  4. Perform 5–10 reps.

12. Bridging

To build a bridge, follow these steps:

  1. Lie on your back with both legs bent at the knees and your feet resting on the floor. With the palms facing down, keep the arms by the sides of the body. Place a small pillow beneath the neck and head for support if necessary.
  2. Raise the pelvis and lower back slowly upward. Make sure your shoulders and upper body stay on the floor.
    For a total of 5 seconds, stay in this position.
  3. Starting at the top of the spine, slowly lower the back and pelvis toward the floor. Roll down your spine until your entire back is flat against the floor once more.
  4. This practice should be repeated 5–10 times.

13. Chair stand

To do a chair stand, follow these steps:

  1. Place a chair against a wall with its back against the wall.
  2. Bend your knees and place your feet flat on the floor while sitting in the front half of the seat. Cross your arms and place one hand on each shoulder on the opposite side.
  3. Recliner back into the chair by pivoting at the hips.
  4. Slowly stand up by leaning your upper body forward once again. While doing this, keep your back, shoulders, and head straight.
  5. Return to your original position by slowly resuming your seat.
  6. To begin, repeat this exercise 4–6 times before progressively increasing to 12 repetitions.

14. Abdominal exercise

To do abdominal exercises, follow these steps:

  1. Lie on your back with your legs bent at the knees and your feet flat on the floor.
  2. Tuck both hands behind your lower back.
  3. Pull the bellybutton downward by concentrating on the muscles in the lower abdomen.
  4. Hold for 20 seconds before relaxing.
  5. This practice should be repeated 5–10 times.

Summary

Hip stretches and exercises can assist to reduce discomfort, improve mobility, and strengthen muscles. There are numerous exercises to pick from, but people can experiment to see which ones work best for them before incorporating them into a program.

A physical therapist can also help a client create an individualized exercise regimen that is tailored to their specific needs.

A doctor should be consulted if hip pain is severe, chronic, or worsening. Any exercises that cause or aggravate hip discomfort should be stopped or reduced.